Frequently Asked Questions about the Thunderbird Registry The purpose of the Registry is document as many examples of Ford Thunderbirds as possible. By documenting these cars, we gain a greater understanding of them: their impact on society, what makes them unique, restoration information, values, and much more. How the information is interpreted is limited only by the user's imagination. With the notable exception of another Ford product, there is likely no other automobile ever built that has captured the interest, imagination, and devotion as the Ford Thunderbird has. The Thunderbird Registry will answer many questions about "how rare" a certain Thunderbird is. It isn't just about being a 1963 Sports Roadster anymore...not in the world of Internet databases. For instance within the Registry's database you will find dozens of interesting and "rare" Thunderbirds based on color (including many special paint cars), interior, options, and engine. The Registry also sorts and lists cars that are known to be located in Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Africa, South America, and Europe. 1. How much does it cost to register a Thunderbird? There is no cost or obligation to register a Thunderbird. 2. What's it worth? The Registry is not an appraisal service and does not advise on values of Thunderbirds. If asked, the Registry can recommend an appraisal service. 3. What years of Thunderbirds are accepted in the Registry?  All years of Thunderbirds. 4. I am concerned about privacy. Must I have my name listed as the owner? There is no requirement to list your name, and the Registry never lists a precise location. You can use an abbreviation of your name, a pseudonym, or "Anonymous". The only requirement is that the Thunderbird's information be listed accurately, in keeping with the spirit of the Registry. 5. Who is Arthur Ash III? During the years 2003-2006, Arthur Ash III spotted over 12,000 Thunderbirds on the Internet, and then registered them. Arthur developed a "speed system" for tracking down Thunderbirds; he wrote his own copy and catalogued pictures of the cars. The Registry and Arthur remain great friends, and it is only fitting that his contributions be acknowledged. Chances are if you pull up a random Registry Number it will have been "submitted by Arthur Ash III" 6. Are cars in junkyards eligible to be in the Registry?  What about a Thunderbird that was in my family 30 years ago? Every Thunderbird, living or dead, regardless of condition or location is eligible to be part of the Registry. Knowing one more Thunderbird VIN helps to fill in the blanks and make the Registry that much more complete. Thunderbirds in the junk yards are just as important as an AACA national meet winner; the Registry is about Thunderbirds, not a Thunderbird or a certain class of Thunderbirds. 7. Can I register a Thunderbird without knowing its VIN?  A Registry Number can only be assigned if the complete and correct VIN is known. However the Registry does maintain a file of cars with partial and unknown VINs in the hopes that these Thunderbirds may be fully identified in the future. 8. How do I know if a car is already part of the Registry?  Go to the Registry database and choose "Advanced Users>>Single RN Data Sheet".   9. How do I register a Thunderbird, or update a car that is already here?  Use the Registration Form. The Thunderbird Registry can serve as a source of information when you are trying to research the history of your Thunderbird. You may be able to find out some previous owner's info, modifications reported, or condition. Similarly, if you are buying a car, you could check to see if it was previously registered, history, or if it was ever been reported stolen. In fact, the Registry has poperly identified and located seven Thunderbirds which had been stolen, and a  few cars which had been "cloned" to look like something other than what it is. ----- ----- ----- And if nothing else, it is fun to look at. ----- ----- -----